Different polls yield varying numbers, and it would be foolish to race ahead, confidently predicting the November outcome based on a few cherry-picked findings from polls taken in April and May. Nevertheless, one can spot obvious signs of trouble for Biden’s campaign, including a recent poll which found that 22 percent of Bernie Sanders’ supporters say they don’t plan to vote for Biden, and a CNN analysis last month that found the 77-year-old Biden underperforming with younger voters. That was before widespread media attention to former aide Tara Reade’s accusations of sexual misconduct against Biden, and a poll released Tuesday found that 28 percent of Democrats now want Biden off the ticket. Never mind, of course, the visible evidence of Biden’s declining mental acuity (“Weekend at Biden’s,” May 4). Oh, yes, and don’t forget that Biden’s son got rich from a sweetheart deal in China, which looks worse in the wake of COVID-19.

Trump obviously has his flaws and weaknesses as a candidate, but these are already well-known to the electorate, whereas Biden’s flaws and weaknesses have not yet been targeted in a sustained campaign. Considering that Trump’s campaign and the Republican National Committee have a cash advantage of $187 million over Biden and the Democratic National Committee, the GOP could at any time unleash a blitz of attack ads aimed at Biden that the Democrat could scarcely afford to answer. With such a massive edge in campaign cash, the Trump/RNC machine could afford to spend $20 million a month on campaign ads, every month between now and November, and still reach election day with more than a $50 million advantage over Biden and the DNC.