In Congress, two sitting House members also promoted in media interviews their own experience with the drug, including Roger Marshall. The Kansas doctor is running in a crowded GOP U.S. Senate primary in the reliably red state and looking to win out over longtime Trump supporter Kris Kobach.

He told The Wall Street Journal earlier this week that he and members of his family were taking the drug prophylactically…

The statements from the GOP congressional candidates troubled Dr. Irwin Redlener, director of the National Center for Disaster Preparedness at Columbia University, who said “maybe they see this as somehow boosting their election probabilities by supporting these preposterous statements and actions by the president.”

“If this is their campaign, then I feel sorry for their districts,” Redlener said. “These are people who should not hold public office. To help support the president making these horrible public decisions about taking non-indicated and potentially dangerous medications, if this is all they have to prove their loyalty to the president, or their connection to the president, then I’m sorry to hear that they’re running.”