One noticeable change will be proximity to other workers; we’ll sit at least 2 meters (6.5 feet) apart. There will be no squeezing in the extra person at the lunch table or in a conference room. Forget hot desking. The use of printers and whiteboards will be frowned upon. Tape or paint will mark off lanes and close off desks to enforce distancing and spacing, even in elevators. Sanitizer stations will be everywhere. We’ll arrive and leave at staggered times, in single file, from separate entrances if possible…

Others have found remote working saves time and energy on commuting, while it has the happy advantage of lessening your chances of infection. Many of these people feel it also provides fewer distractions and a better life balance without sacrificing productivity (although others have found all hope of balance or delineation between work and personal time has gone out the window).

The “WFH” fans will take a dim view of the brave new workplace. I can bounce between the opposing views depending on the day and task, but I probably lean toward thinking that a remote-working option balanced with plenty of office time is optimal. That seems confirmed by studies that show workers are happiest when they have some control over their environment.