Guy Benson: OK. So I actually tend to find myself nodding along with Zuckerberg on both of those points. Senator, from a political perspective and some of the bias that we have seen undoubtedly within the big tech sphere against conservatives, but also from a constitutionalist perspective, you’re a constitutional lawyer. How do you muddle through some of these tricky questions?

Sen. Lee: You keep you keep government as far away from it as you possibly can. Look, this may be attractive from a distance to some at any given moment, but it’s a very dangerous, slippery slope to start opening the door to having the government regulate these platforms. And I tend to agree with you. I tend to agree with Mark Zuckerberg on both points. Mark Zuckerberg has been a thought leader in this area, and I applaud him on both of the observations that he made, including the fact that Facebook has made a decision, a wise decision and a decision that I think it’s going to be good for business and good for public policy at the same time to not try to be the arbiter of every political argument that goes out there. There are certain things that they’re not going to allow, things that amount to threats to cause imminent harm to another person. Things like that. They’ll take that down. But as far as meddling into the public political arena and deciding who got what argument right, they’re going to stay out of that. And I think that’s wise policy on their part. And I also think it’s wise to keep the government away from it. Governments have force as their only real weapon. You don’t want force deciding the art of persuasion or deciding the art of communication with social media.

Guy Benson: Because I also wonder if this is what conservatives try to do to retaliate against something that they don’t like. If you empower the government to sort of throw their weight around in this venue, right in this arena, and you give them even more power. When President Trump and the Republican Party or the conservative movement is out of power, I’m not sure that you necessarily want to entrust additional power on content and punishing speech, however you want to broadly define it. If it’s let’s say, you know, Joe Biden is president, Kamala Harris is as vice president and, you know, God knows who is their attorney general. I think you have to be careful about thinking about. How you would view exactly this type of authority in the hands of people that you disagree with? Right.

Sen. Lee: Yes, yes, that’s exactly the point. And that’s why I say you don’t want to open that door, because even if you would like the policies that the current administration might employ if it started stepping into this arena, that that’s good for now. If you agree with it. But it’s not good for whether it’s a few months or a few years from now, whenever circumstances might change. It’s just terrible precedent long term. This stuff doesn’t belong to the government. It’s not the government’s tool to play with. We need to keep the two of them separated.