“This is a voting bloc that we used to call ‘soccer moms,’ and it’s been an area of concern [for the Republican Party], as far as the demographics of voters go, since George W. Bush,” said Barry Bennett, a GOP operative and lobbyist who served as a senior Trump adviser during the 2016 campaign. “So I think it’s part of the re-make-up of what the electorate looks like, and it’s not entirely a Trump-specific problem. It’s a rejiggering of the electoral make-up, for sure. [Suburban women are] an easy target to get to and an easy target to message to, and [Trump 2020 and the GOP] should be doing a better job. But it’s not a five-alarm fire yet.”…

“Trump owed his support in the suburbs to college-educated men who could look past the bombast and Twitter controversy in order to keep economic leadership in the hands of pro-business Republican leadership. As the economy shakes to the core, the risk of electing a big-spending, tax-hiking Democratic president takes a back seat,” said David Kochel, a prominent GOP operative in Iowa who is advising federal and statewide politicians there…

Data compiled by the progressive firm Navigator polling showed a major erosion in support among Republican voters—and women in particular—for loosening stay-at-home directives. On April 16, 40 percent of GOP women said they worried that those restrictions would “go too long” and 41 percent worried that they’d “end too soon.” One week later—after Trump had embraced the idea of “liberat[ing]” states—those numbers stood at 32 percent and 53 percent.