2. Videoconferencing imposes cognitive and psychological frictions and aggravates social anxieties. As experts in human-computer interaction point out, using Zoom means putting on a show for others without being able to rely on the cues we primates depend on in physical encounters.

There’s usually a slight audio lag, as well as mute-button mistakes and “your internet connection is unstable”-style dropouts.

By showing us our own image as well as others’, Zoom ensures that we will critique ourselves in real time.

We’re also often opening a chunk of our homes for others to view, and that can trigger social worries (something that is also a big issue for kids in online classes).