“It’s hard to see Jewish voters backing a president who believes there are very fine people on both sides of a neo-Nazi rally,” said Democratic strategist Jesse Ferguson, who is unaffiliated with any of the 2020 campaigns. Ferguson was referring to a rally of white supremacists in Charlottesville, Virginia, in the summer of 2017, after which Democrats and some Republicans claimed Trump did not adequately condemn those involved…

“The Reform movement is the largest branch of American Judaism, but I’d expect that group would be most resistant to change,” [Herb Weisberg] said. “They have become most concerned with the increase in anti-Semitic attacks against American Jews in Charlottesville, Pittsburgh, and Poway, which they associate with President Trump’s comments and policies.”

Jewish voters are a dependable Democratic constituency, although that advantage has been more pronounced in some presidential elections than in others. In 1980, Ronald Reagan won 39% of the Jewish vote. Twenty years later, just 19% of Jews voted for George W. Bush. In 2016, Trump won 24% of Jewish voters, a 6-point drop from the 30% Mitt Romney received four years previous.