The internet has been perhaps the Sanders campaign’s most useful tool for organizing the candidate’s most fervent fans, whose ride-or-die loyalty to Sanders has long outlasted his first campaign for president.

But like Star Wars, Rick and Morty, and Taylor Swift before him, Sanders is grappling with how to channel the best parts of that support—the engine behind his massive rally crowds and commensurate fundraising numbers, and as he is sequestered on Capitol Hill for the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump—while discouraging a toxic wedge of fandom that threatens to distract from his campaign and turn off potential supporters…

The “Bernie Bro” question has plagued Sanders’ campaign since he last ran for president in 2016, when top campaign officials felt obligated to reach out to rival campaigns to apologize for the behavior of some of Sanders’ more rabid fans. Sanders’ condemnation of his most aggressive online supporters has been unequivocal for years—he called their behavior “disgusting” in a 2017 interview with CNN’s Jake Tapper—and his response to Clinton’s remarks on Tuesday morning were so conciliatory that Republicans dragged him for being a wimp.