Paul — now the editor of “The New York Times Book Review” — is hardly a Trump supporter, or even a conservative. Neither is Chyng-Feng Sun, an NYU professor and director of “The Price of Pleasure,” a frequently-cited documentary that portrays pornography as fundamentally abusive and harmful to women, who also appeared on that panel to make a case against porn. But both of these women now find themselves, whether advertently or not, aligned with a contingent of the conservative movement who’ve recently stepped up attempts to get President Donald Trump — who ironically signed an anti-porn pledge as a candidate in 2016 — to take action against the supposed evils of porn.

But the liberal voices who’ve helped pave the way for the latest conservative assault on pornography might want to take a moment before further aligning themselves with this latest conservative cause. Because while panic about porn is an eternally bipartisan issue, it’s a partnership that rarely works out in liberals’ overall favor.

The political desire to censor, heavily regulate or ban pornography and criminalize adult industry rarely ends with that issue alone, because anti-porn conservatives are not one-issue conservatives.