The travel ban was only discussed for fewer than two minutes during the first two primary debates in June and July, they note. They say it’s rarely mentioned in candidates’ stump speeches, either.

“This is an issue that they aren’t taking as seriously as they should be,” said Mohamed Gula, executive director of the Muslim advocacy group Emgage USA and a former staffer on Hillary Clinton’s 2016 campaign. “Us being about 1 percent of the American population, to be ignored in that way, is definitely kind of putting a chip on our shoulder.”

Added Rabyaah Althaibani, a co-founder of the political consulting group Arab Women’s Voice: “It’s disappointing. I’m Yemeni and I don’t know a single Yemeni family that isn’t directly impacted by the Muslim ban.”

Activists also argue that the Democratic presidential contenders have not paid enough attention to Islamophobia and the recent spike in anti-Muslim hate crimes. Nor are they mobilizing Muslim voters quickly enough ahead of the presidential election, they say.