For Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, the lesson should be: Don’t bet so big on President Donald Trump. The U.S.-Israel relationship is bigger than people, parties, and politics. It’s a profound state-to-state relationship, and even if the prime minister supposes he is getting a better deal from this president than the previous one, that’s no reason to forget there will also be a next president, and a president after that. When Democratic friends of Israel such as Chuck Schumer, Steny Hoyer, and Rahm Emanuel tell you that you are dangerously overstepping partisan limits, listen to them. Your successors will certainly wish you had.

For those covering these issues: How many more lessons do you need of the bottomless bad faith of Tlaib and Omar on Israel issues? A politician who will certify one day that she’s prepared to set aside her advocacy of boycotts to visit her grandmother, and then the next say that it would “kill a piece of me” to do so, should be handled with extreme care. Omar can pivot from accusing American Jews of disloyalty to the United States to expressing shock and outrage that anyone would question her attachment to the United States.