Sovereignty was its lodestar, and it meant something along the lines of trade and immigration restrictions at the border, military restraint abroad, and nationalist projects like major infrastructure spending at home. There was the Teddy Roosevelt-inspired suspicion of big business (hardly inapplicable in the era of woke Nike) and of monopoly power too.

The president has implemented this agenda in fits and starts and with some success, though he’s been waylaid by the endless Russia probe and a judiciary that has blocked several key initiatives. Mr. Trump has also undermined his own cause with some bizarre personnel choices. The dovish Mr. Trump appointed uber-hawk John R. Bolton as his national security adviser. The lover of big infrastructure projects and self-styled “king of debt” made the green-eyeshades-donning Mick Mulvaney his chief of staff.

Yet there still exists a distilled form of “Trumpism,” and its purest expression may come in the form of the youngest member of the Senate.

Josh Hawley, a newly elected Republican from Missouri who has not yet rung in his 40th birthday, offers a coherent, thoughtful version of Trumpism — a vision of what Trumpism-sans-tweets looks like.