All of which raises two questions: If Kilkenny’s nearly 40 years of diversity efforts have failed to put Georgetown’s equity challenges to rest, why is she being promoted? And second: What possible equity challenges remain? After four decades of attention, if Georgetown has still not smoked out all its allegedly racist faculty who fail to treat minority students equally; if it continues to admit rapists; and if students of color, females, and gays still face constricted opportunities, perhaps the university should shut down.

After all, it’s not just Kilkenny who has been chasing racism and sexism at Georgetown. So have the Office of Institutional Diversity, Equity, and Affirmative Action; the Office of Affirmative Action and University Human Resources; the Diversity Advisory Board; the Center for Multicultural Equity and Access; the Working Group on Reporting Incidents of Intolerance (not to be confused with the Working Group on Racial Justice); the Initiative on Diversity and Inclusiveness; the School of Medicine Office of Diversity and Inclusion; the School of Medicine Subcommittee on Faculty Diversity and Inclusion; the Law Center Office of Equity and Inclusion; the Center for Social Justice Research, Teaching and Service; the Women’s Center; the LGBTQ Resource Center; and the Initiative on LGBTQ Student Resources.

Nor has Georgetown been reticent on the question of identity and alleged identity-based exclusion. To the contrary, it has developed a whole series of bureaucrat-overseen student “dialogues” around students’ race, ethnicity, gender, and sexual orientation.