Ever since she narrowly lost the Georgia governor’s race six months ago, Stacey Abrams has been claiming that she “won” the election. Most recently, on April 28 she told The New York Times Magazine, “I cannot say that everybody who tried to cast a ballot would’ve voted for me, but if you look at the totality of the information, it is sufficient to demonstrate that so many people were disenfranchised and disengaged by the very act of the person who won the election that I feel comfortable now saying, ‘I won.'”

This absurd declaration is predicated on a cascading series of misleading statements Abrams is making about voter disenfranchisement. A May 15 New York Times op-ed by Abrams, headlined, “We Cannot Resign Ourselves to Dismay and Disenfranchisement,” details more of these disputable and tendentious claims.

This kind of thing began even before the campaign had ended. As if to inoculate herself, Abrams accused her opponent, Brian Kemp, of fostering an “atmosphere of fear” during a debate two weeks before Election Day. Georgia voters, she proclaimed, “have been purged, they have been suppressed, they have been scared.”