The reports were based on a Washington Post article, which described how Chasten, 29, was forced out of the family home and never reconciled with his two brothers.

But rather than rejecting his brother Chasten, a would-be “first gentleman,” Glezman, who has run the Clio Community Church for the past two years, said his family has been loving and supportive throughout.

“A mayor from a small city and his husband, a child who grew up with nothing and his parents kicked him out … it makes a perfect political story for the campaign,” he said in an interview with the Washington Examiner at his church in Clio. “To me that’s very sad. If that’s all you have to stand on, you’re not fit to be president of the United States.”