“Oh, it’s impractical. Oh, it’s too expensive. Oh, it’s all this,” Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.) told voters on his maiden trip to Iowa this month, when asked about the global warming plans promoted by House liberals. “If we used to govern our dreams that way, we would have never have gone to the moon.”

The ambitious policy talk is giving Democrats a do-over on the 2016 election, in which the aggressive and sometimes patently unworkable policy approach of Donald Trump proved more appealing to key voting groups than the incremental but more realistic agenda of Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton.

A recent poll of New Hampshire Democratic voters by St. Anselm College found more than 8 in 10 voters supported unspecific notions such as a “Green New Deal,” “Medicare-for-all” and reestablishing regulations on Wall Street.

“I think this is much more a reaction to Trump than anything else. The Trump campaign and the Trump presidency have widened the aperture of acceptable policy debates,” said Neera Tanden, the president of the liberal Center for American Progress. “So I think the progressive response to that is to break through.”