Weld would be insufferable enough on his own without the approximately 900,000 puff pieces we are going to read about him over the course of the next few months. In an article announcing his proposed candidacy on Friday, The Washington Post refers to the 73-year-old former governor of Massachusetts — who, again, has not held political office since 1997 — as Trump’s first “high-profile challenger.” They must have meant his forehead viewed from the side, which does indeed feature a very distinguished-looking widow’s peak. The Post also informs us that Weld, who supports abortion, same-sex marriage, gun control, and drug legalization, will run on a “traditional Republican agenda.” They gush about his “unflinching denunciation” of the president (Weld called him a “bully”) in his speech. Weld says that he cannot allow himself to sit back while “our precious democracy slips quietly into darkness.” Choirs need preachers too.

Don’t get me wrong. A small number of people in Washington, D.C., agree with Weld about virtually everything of importance, from the unquestionable importance of a globalized free trade system to even more serious questions, like how icky on a scale of one to eleventy bazillion Drumpf is. I’m sure that some of them really are okay with Weld’s disgusting comparison of Trump’s immigration policy to “the glass crunching on Kristallnacht in the ghettos of Warsaw and Vienna.” (A handful might even care enough about the legacy of the Holocaust to recall that the Night of Broken Glass took place in Germany nearly a year before the Nazis invaded Poland.) He has a constituency — the same one as Evan McMullin.