1. The mega-state of California has about a quarter of the delegates needed to nominate a president. It has moved its primary to March (from its traditional June date) and the winner will garner outsize media attention – and delegates. While California isn’t winner-take-all and apportions its delegates by congressional district, Harris is likely to dominate the delegate count. Any candidate who wins less than 15 percent of the vote in a Congressional seat won’t get any delegates, with their votes allocated to those getting above that number. Analysts say Harris probably can place first in almost every district and will likely win the lioness’ share of delegates.

2. Democratic primaries are now heavily “feminized.” In 2016, 58 percent of Democratic primary voters were women. That figure is likely to top 60 percent in 2020 because recent polls show 62 percent of self-described Democrats are women. Women are also increasingly likely to vote for another woman – especially in the wake of the #MeToo sexual harassment movement. A poll by the Barbara Lee Family Foundation found that 37 percent of women said #MeToo made them more likely to vote for female candidates. That number rises to 50 percent among millennial women and 40 percent among African-American women.