Whatever you think of Trump, allowing the FBI to launch counterintelligence operations on the president merely because it found the foreign policy offensive is both dangerous and arguably unconstitutional. We’ll soon know if there was any evidence to substantiate such a remarkable investigation. But one serious dilemma with this kind of investigation is that Americans have widely divergent ideas about what “American interests” look like. Which ones is the FBI going to treat as potentially criminal?

No one contemplated investigating or impeaching Barack Obama after he was caught on a hot mic assuring Putin’s puppet that he was lying to the American electorate and would have “more flexibility” to acquiesce to Russia’s demands on NATO missile defense in Europe. Certainly, no counterintelligence investigation was launched when the Obama administration funded and gave cover to the American-killing Islamic regime in Iran (and its terrorist proxies) in the name of peace. The obsequiousness of Obama administration officials toward Iran should have sounded alarms at the FBI.

Moreover, in the real world, Trump has given the same kind of impulsive and inconsistent positions on Russia as he’s gives on a number of issues. On the policy front, there’s a good argument that he’s been at least as tough, or probably tougher, on Russia than the previous two administrations.