We should be ready to accept the very real possibility that serious misdemeanors were committed and lies told. Frankly, if it becomes clear that the president made foreign policy or public policy decisions—while in office—based on the fact that he was in some way (a) compromised, or (b) seeking personal gain by virtue of his position, that would be a bridge too far.

We’re not there yet, but we could get there. And what will conservatives do or say if we do? What will they say if their leader does something so egregious as to render himself no longer worthy of even the most fawning conservative’s loyalty? The people who defend the indefensible—who put “loyalty” to a man (not principle or America) above all else—will not be judged well by history.

Trump has created an environment where every conservative really must be introspective about where they draw the line and at what point they are willing to stand with him. For Republican politicians, it seems highly unlikely there will be any sort of legislation to protect Robert Mueller. But that doesn’t absolve them from wrestling with questions like: What do they do if Trump (or his recently installed attorney general) actually goes ahead and fires Mueller?