Brett Kavanaugh seemed like the dream Supreme Court nominee for Republican voters and activists when he was nominated in mid-July. He had the résumé and experience to be confirmed relatively easily, but also a clear ideological background that suggested he would join the conservatives already on the high court in overturning Roe v. Wade. But as Kavanaugh’s nomination has grown more contentious amid allegations of sexual misconduct, prominent conservatives have not pushed for his confirmation by hyping up his potential to push jurisprudence to the right, such as by limiting abortion.

Instead, GOP leaders, including President Trump, have waged what amounts to an aggressive anti-#MeToo campaign in Kavanaugh’s defense, not only rejecting the charge that he behaved improperly but more broadly arguing that men in America are in peril. Perhaps the most remarkable comments of the past 10 days have not come from Kavanaugh or Christine Blasey Ford (who alleged that Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her), but from Trump and Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina.

Graham said, “I’m a single white male from South Carolina, and I’m told I should just shut up, but I will not shut up.”