During the trial, Ellis intervened regularly, and mainly against one side: the prosecution. The judge’s interruptions occurred in the presence of the jury and on matters of substance, not courtroom conduct. He disparaged the prosecution’s evidence, misstated its legal theories, even implied that prosecutors had disobeyed his orders when they had not.

Under the Code of Conduct for U.S. judges, a judge is supposed to be fair and impartial, as well as “patient, dignified, respectful and courteous” to those in his courtroom. The rule’s concern is as much about the appearance of justice as its reality. If the judge violates that rule and a defendant is convicted, there may be a trial remedy — an appeal.

But there will be no appeal available to address Ellis’s anti-prosecution bias if Manafort is acquitted by the jurors, who began deliberating on Thursday.