It is because of the superiority of the American health care system that single-payer systems still exist around the world. Without the United States outperforming the rest of the world in research and development, their medical systems would collapse. Single-payer systems around the world can survive only because they benefit from what the health care industry in the U.S. produces.

There is also no need for a single-payer system as the purported 46 million uninsured before Obamacare (also known as the Affordable Care Act) in the U.S. has never held up to research. About 5 million of those are illegal immigrants. Another quarter qualify but can’t be bothered to fill out the paperwork. Then there are those who make easily enough to buy health insurance, but prefer to go without it and pay for their medical costs as they arise. Survey after survey reports that at any one time about 80-90 percent of Americans are insured, with the same amount being satisfied with their health care.

Over the last decade, for example, health care and social assistance employment in Iowa has soared from around 145,000 in 2007 to about 185,000 in 2012, according to the 11th edition of Iowa’s Workforce and the Economy. Insurance and health care are also growing segments of the state’s economy. This would be truncated with a single-payer system. A single-payer system in the United States would reduce the quality of health care for Americans and the quantity of opportunities available for all around the world.