Recognizing her desperation, Dauer’s doctor referred her to Kutluk Oktay, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the Yale School of Medicine and one of the preeminent experts of a new process called ovary freezing.

Oktay walked her through the steps: He would remove one of her ovaries, slice pieces from the top tissue layers, and freeze the slices in liquid nitrogen. If the chemotherapy worked, and she remained cancer-free for two years, he would re-implant the tissue and hope that the eggs would begin maturing normally…

“Fronads” follows Dauer, one of the first patients to undergo the groundbreaking procedure. And miraculously, it worked. Dauer, who had been once been told that she had a one in five million chance of ever becoming pregnant, had three children within six years of reimplantation. The procedure was so successful that her husband, Greg, had a vasectomy.