The list goes on, but the point is that with few exceptions — a notable one is school choice — black voter priorities more closely overlay those of Democrats as a whole. When you add in the fact that in recent years, Democrats, generally speaking, have been more supportive than Republicans on African American priorities related to criminal justice restructuring and that the current Republican president was a birther, it only follows that black voters would find themselves in the Democratic camp.

Like every other demographic, African Americans vote their interests, real or perceived. In the context of a two-party system, the fact that black voters overwhelmingly support Democrats isn’t an indicator of groupthink, it’s an indicator of an informed black electorate.

If Owens prefers the GOP platform, then, certainly, she should support it. But as Rolling Stone’s Jamil Smith points out, “Contrarianism is a much lesser goal than iconoclasm, and much easier to achieve.” Calling other people victims, or slaves, isn’t an argument about the proper size and scope of government. It’s not a defense of a foreign-policy doctrine. It’s not an anti-choice argument. And it’s not a coherent (or, for that matter, conservative) explanation for police brutality.