Support for Donald Trump among white women is cratering. This helps explain why, after days of tacitly condoning alleged spousal abuse by Rob Porter, which Porter denies, and former White House speechwriter David Sorensen, who also denies the accusations made against him, the president finally said last week that he was “totally opposed to domestic violence.”

It’s always been unfathomable to me that Donald Trump won a majority of white female votes in 2016, but he did. This was after the notorious Access Hollywood tape, the allegations of more than a dozen women who said he sexually harassed them.

The downward numbers are most pronounced in the Rust Belt, where Trump cleaned up in November 2016 and even carried the formerly Democratic states of Michigan and Wisconsin. A state by state Gallup poll released in February showed that nationally, Trump’s national approval rating for 2017 was an anemic 38%.

But here was the real alarm bell. The poll detected what looked like the beginning of a collapse among white, non-college educated female voters, his base. In the Rust Belt states that decided 2016, Trump slipped into a precarious position with these women.