The former campaign adviser endorsed Trump’s view, saying his support is “not tied to a specific policy, it’s tied to disrupting, it’s tied to shaking up the status quo.”

“That’s what the base likes, bringing disruption to a city that has been mired in gridlock,” the aide said.

On Friday, Trump tacitly acknowledged his newfound love for bipartisanship carries political risk.

The president rallied supporters with a string of tough-talking early morning tweets on the terror attack in London and an ESPN host who called him a white supremacist.