Danish authorities said the cameras allowed them to quickly piece together the 14-hour path of the suspect shooter through Denmark’s capital city from his first assault on a downtown cafe to a second attack against a synagogue and eventually locate him near a Copenhagen train station where he was killed by police.

While police cameras are largely limited to Stroget, a popular tourist shopping street in central Copenhagen, private banks, residential buildings and shops have largely embraced video surveillance, forming an informal footage-gathering network that can be mobilized in the event of a security crisis.

Video surveillance is an integral part of the Copenhagen transportation system and helped police quickly trace the gunman after a tip-off by a taxi driver, said Magnus Ranstorp, a counterterrorism expert at the Swedish National Defence College.