Psychologists at Brunel University in London measured the bodies of 125 men and women using a 3D scanner, calculating traditionally attractive traits such as slimness and waist-to-hip ratio (for the latter group). They then completed a personality test, which assessed their attitudes to selfishness and inequality, before partaking in a money-based economics experiment, designed to challenge their beliefs on having and sharing wealth.

“Our results showed that in fact we may be justified in expecting more attractive men to behave in ways that are less favourable to economic and social equality,” says the paper’s lead investigator, Dr. Michael Price. “The results suggest that better-looking men may be biased towards being more selfish and less egalitarian.”