After this litany, what can explain the fact that the pro-life movement is “not dead yet”? For starters, science and technology have been very good to us over the past several decades. Embryology, genetics, neurology, not to mention ultrasound technology — they are probably responsible for the fact that none of the abortion-rights Web sites bothers any longer to attack the humanity of the unborn child.

Second, the human rights nature of the abortion debate just never gets old. Journalist Gail Collins can characterize abortion as a “privacy” matter 10 times per article, and it still fails to persuade. Pregnancy involves the mother’s body, but the child is not only hers. The unborn child is vulnerable and dependent. Evolving standards of decency compel us to treat the vulnerable with particular care.

Third, pro-lifers have persisted against opposition that can boast of significant amounts of money and academic credentials. Indeed, we are flourishing. Our ranks are most recently swelled by millennials who show up at the annual March for Life in cheerful droves, armed with clever signs and infectious enthusiasm.