“If he pops up on American Idol or a Super Bowl halftime show, this is just a president in the modern era trying to talk to a whole constituency of audiences by going all over the place,” says Robert Thompson, a professor of pop culture at Syracuse University.

But Obama has been eager and willing to appear in so many different forums that it raises the question of whether it’s possible, in the modern media age, for even a president to become overexposed.

“You get this sense that you can’t turn on the television without one of the Obamas on it,” Thompson says…

“If people were enthusiastic about government and politics, they would watch C-SPAN, but they don’t, so you kind of have to reach the audience where they are,” says Matthew Eshbaugh-Soha, author of Breaking Through the Noise: Presidential Leadership, Public Opinion and the News Media.