With such heart-wrenching stories readily available, why has the Obama team shied away from bringing the law into sharper focus now that it’s been ruled constitutional? Bill McInturff, a Republican pollster, says it comes down to resources in a campaign that is already fully engaged in an all-out air war.

“The Obama campaign could only try to promote the ACA by extensive paid advertising, but it would mean diverting money from their Romney assault,” he says. “From a campaign perspective, my bet would be if given that choice, the campaign would always choose staying negative on Romney.”

Online ads won’t break the bank, or strain the patience of voters who according to polls are ready to move on. In the Washington Post/ABC poll, just 18 percent want to repeal the whole law, and another 16 percent want to repeal parts of it. Sixty-five percent support the law or take a “wait and see” approach. Obama does bring up health care in his stump speech daily, talking about it Tuesday afternoon in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and last week on his bus tour through Ohio and Pennsylvania, but it has not been a main focus. The campaign’s largest mailing so far focused on health care, and it went to 1 million women.

“They’ve got to do something to get people to better understand what this thing does,” says Bennett.