Now, it is possible that some reading this are now saying, “Okay John, if you are right and this is going to play out like 2008, doesn’t that mean Cain would be the next president?” The answer to that is decidedly no; because the fundamental reality of presidential elections, the one which has prevented conservatives from finding their next Reagan, is that the rules in a general election are totally different for Republicans than they are for Democrats. The incredibly unfair treatment of Sarah Palin in comparison to Obama in 2008 should have, if nothing else, at least ended any question about that obvious truth.

If a Republican had Obama’s ties to Rev. Wright he would have gotten slaughtered by the increasingly partisan mainstream media. Similarly, Cain has already given the media more than enough to “Palinize” him should he be the nominee. His 9-9-9 plan can be easily demonized, his statements about Muslims and Gays will be used to make him seem like an extremist nut, and his own admissions regarding his lack of interest in foreign policy will turn an Obama weakness from 2008 into a decided advantage. All this is already exists before the real pressure of a campaign even begins and Cain’s penchant for “straight talk’ surely comes back to haunt him on multiple occasions.

In short, a Cain/Obama campaign would be fun, but it would also result in a democratic landslide at the polls. The only “conservatives” who would gain from that scenario are those in the media. Unfortunately, they are also the ones controlling a narrative that most of their customers can’t currently see the danger of.

As inequitable as it is, conservatives are simply not allowed to nominate an Obama.