Brown adviser Eric Fehrnstrom told POLITICO recently that he’s untroubled by “conventional wisdom that this somehow spells trouble for Scott Brown,” arguing: “I think people will look at the political landscape and see that Scott is the only Republican in an all-Democrat delegation, and I find it hard to believe they’re going to oust him because they’re going to want to retain some sense of a two-party balance…

What Brown has going for him is this that he has consistently posted high favorability ratings, unlike Baker and other losing Republicans this year. He’s running as the incumbent, while Democrats will be fighting each other through a late, September primary. His trips this year as a campaign surrogate have taken him to essential fundraising destinations from Chicago to Burbank, and he had nearly $7 million stockpiled at the end of September.

“If you’re looking at this, if you’re the Brown folks, there’s nothing in these numbers that should really scare you, like there’s some shift in the electorate. The anti-Democrat, anti-Beacon Hill vote is still there,” argued one Republican involved in the state, noting that Brown “remains extremely popular. His biggest challenge is just the turnout you’re going to have in a presidential year.”