Senior CIA and GID officials were so beguiled by the prospect of a strike against al-Qaeda’s inner sanctum that they discounted concerns raised by case officers in both services that Balawi might be a fraud, according to the former U.S. official and the Jordanian government official, who has an intelligence background.

The Americans took over the management of Balawi from the Jordanians sometime in the second half of 2009, dictating how and when the informant would meet his handlers, according to current and former U.S. intelligence officers. Agency field officers faced unusual pressures from top CIA and administration officials in Washington keyed up by Balawi’s promise to deliver al-Qaeda’s deputy leader, Ayman al-Zawahiri, the current and former officers said…

“If you read his articles, you understand he is a Salafi jihadi since birth,” said Hasan Hanieh, an author and former Islamic radical, referring to a purist strain of Islam known as Salafism. “They go to the core of his beliefs. Over years, I could see this type of person moderate, but such a person does not become an agent. Never.”…

“First, the guy had extremist credentials, including proven access to senior figures,” the U.S. intelligence official said. “Second, you had a sound liaison service that believed they’d turned him and that had been working with him since. And third, the asset supplied intelligence that was independently verified. You don’t ignore those kinds of things, but you don’t trust the guy, either.”