All books have mistakes, so why pick on the feminists? My complaint with feminist research is not so much that the authors make mistakes; it is that the mistakes are impervious to reasoned criticism. They do not get corrected. The authors are passionately committed to the proposition that American women are oppressed and under siege. The scholars seize and hold on for dear life to any piece of data that appears to corroborate their dire worldview. At the same time, any critic who attempts to correct the false assumptions is dismissed as a backlasher and an anti-feminist crank.

Why should it matter if a large number of professors think and say a lot of foolish and intemperate things? Here are three reasons to be concerned…

“Thug,” “parasite,” “dangerous,” a “female impersonator” — those are some of the labels applied to me when I exposed specious feminist statistics in my 1994 book Who Stole Feminism? (Come to think of it, none of my critics contacted me directly with their concerns before launching their public attacks.) According to Susan Friedman, of the University of Wisconsin at Madison, “Sommers’ diachronic discourse is easily unveiled as synchronic discourse in drag. … She practices … metonymic historiography.” That one hurt! But my views, as well as my metonymic historiography, are always open to correction. So I’ll continue to follow the work of the academic feminists — to criticize it when it is wrong, and to learn from it when it is right.