Kamala Harris can’t fix her office, much less the border

The voyage to El Paso illustrated another Harris vulnerability: She’s a terrible manager. Leaks and infighting bedeviled her short-lived presidential campaign. Working for her is hazardous to your health. Or at least that’s what an anonymous source told Politico on June 30. The blockbuster story, carrying three bylines and based on interviews with 22 "current and former vice-presidential aides, administration officials, and associates of Harris and Biden," left no doubt that Harris runs a dysfunctional operation. "It’s not a place where people feel supported but a place where people feel treated like s—," said a "person with direct knowledge of how Harris’s office is run." Imagine what they say on the office Slack channel.

Biden adviser Anita Dunn told Politico that the situation was "not anywhere near what you are describing." Perhaps it’s worse. One of Harris’s former Senate aides said, "The boss’s expectations won’t always be predictable." Not exactly what you want in a leader. Politico says Harris "excels when those around her project calm and order, creating a sense of confidence and certainty." Unfortunately, confidence and certainty are precisely those qualities that go missing in the ad hoc, improvisational, contingent, and situational world of global politics.

More interviews and stories like these and Harris will soon be living the politician’s worst nightmare: becoming a punchline. A cynic might say that Biden purposely handed Harris the toughest assignments to redirect negative public sentiment away from the Oval Office and to displace the frustrations and embarrassments he experienced during eight years as Barack Obama’s vice president. Democratic strategists worry that Harris exhibits none of Biden’s strengths, such as they are, while shouldering all his weaknesses. That doesn’t bode well if Biden opts not to run in 2024.