GameStop’s craze has caught the eye of a new set of investors: Children

It was the perfect storm of free time, access to social media and increasingly user-friendly ways of trading stocks, like smartphone apps. Kids who have been learning remotely are spending more time online and even following the news more closely than before. The framing of the surge as little guys taking on hedge funds was especially appealing.

With the stock now worth far less than its peak price of $347, it’s become a real-world learning experience for anyone dipping their toes in the sometimes dry world of investment.

“The recent news has sparked a lot of interest. Parents should strike while the iron is hot. Sign them up for a class, get them a book,” said Keallah Smith, who teaches students between the ages of 9 and 19 about financial basics.

She has a class on online education site Outschool called “Financial Literacy for Kids” and said there’s been a surge in interest in the stock market from her students this week. While GameStop didn’t pan out well for many traders, and goes contrary to most beginner investment advice, she said it can be a great jumping-off point.