Democrats' debate divisions open the race to new (or old) faces

Ultimately this debate reflects two fundamental weaknesses of the field. I think there is no one so far who has shown they are likely to consolidate a majority of the party, and so the most likely outcome is more debates with fewer candidates but a convention that will be decided by super-delegates and political deals. And the flip side of this weakness is that the likes of Hillary Clinton, Michael Bloomberg, John Kerry and perhaps even Michele Obama have got to be thinking of getting in and trying to transcend the moderate and liberal wings of the party. They all are watching Biden, gauging whether he is strong enough to pull off a comeback or so weak that the nomination will likely fall into the hands of Warren. After this debate, they still are on the fence and the party is just as divided as ever.

Debates operate against expectations and so, from that vantage point, Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) is the clear winner — he was supposed to be completely out of the race following a recent heart attack. I am not sure why people want to be president so much that they are back into the fray so soon after such an event, but Sanders was determined not to be counted out just yet. And the announcement that Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.), and perhaps her entire “Squad,” will be endorsing him brings him back into the game with a burst of enthusiasm from the youth-dominated “justice” wing of the party.