Why charging Ghislaine Maxwell is going to be difficult

In the days since convicted pedophile Jeffrey Epstein killed himself in a Manhattan jail cell, there has been a growing public outcry asking why his longtime confidante and alleged accomplice Ghislaine Maxwell has not yet been charged. Former FBI Assistant Director Frank Figliuzzi asked, “Why is she still walking around?” And after a photo (since discredited) emerged purporting to show Maxwell eating outside an In-N-Out Burger restaurant, one prominent legal analyst asked, “Why is the most wanted woman in America just walking around L.A.?”

Unfortunately, the answer is likely that law enforcement simply does not yet have sufficient evidence to ensure a conviction of Maxwell. If they had enough evidence, they would have charged her already. Getting that evidence will not be anywhere near as easy as some pundits might suggest.

The public outcry for prosecutors to quickly charge Maxwell is understandable. After all, several women, who say they were victims of Epstein, have alleged she procured underage girls for him, bragged about it, and called them “trash.” One attorney for victims alleges that Maxwell was an “active participant in the sexual abuse.” Maxwell has denied the allegations.