Social justice warriors are the new vigilantes

The News & Observer’s coverage included a story which said the ban “may be resonating with some people who remember segregated beaches, black theater balconies with separate entrances, and signs over courthouse water fountains that read, ‘COLORED’ or ‘WHITE.’”

The paper also ran an op-ed by a Duke University professor who said the rules reflect a broader effort by whites, “often in collusion with law enforcement, to police black behavior.”

My fake news alarm pinged as I read such reports which were rife with accusations of white supremacist behavior but empty of evidence to support these damning claims.

Most accounts did include denials from the pool’s owners, John and Teresa Freeman, who said they didn’t know what dreadlocks were and just wanted prohibit artificial hair from clogging the pool’s filters. But their explanations were drowned out in coverage that touted racist pool rules and stories which made little effort to see if African-Americans were actually being excluded.