Nine hours of "Executive Time": Trump’s unstructured days define his presidency

Some White House aides insist that president is productive during these open stretches, calling lawmakers, Cabinet members and world leaders, and scheduling meetings rather than simply watching television in the private dining room off the Oval Office. One aide even described Trump as a “workaholic.”

But the president’s official commitments last week began no earlier than 11 a.m. according to the schedules obtained by POLITICO, and on Tuesday — in the midst of a potential serial bomber and two weeks ahead of the midterm elections — they didn’t start until 1 p.m.

Trump’s work activity also reflects much more time spent on the performative aspects of the job, like signing ceremonies and media interviews, than on the grunt work of policymaking…

Last week’s schedules are remarkably light on policy discussions. The president spent just over two hours of his week in policy briefings, according to his schedules, and he was scheduled to receive the President’s Daily Brief on just two of the five days reviewed.