What do you do when you are anonymously accused of rape?

Ms. Donegan declined to comment for this article. But in January, in a widely read, affecting essay for New York Magazine in which she outed herself as the list’s creator, she explained its purpose: It was an “attempt at solving what has seemed like an intractable problem: how women can protect ourselves from sexual harassment and assault.”

It may have served that purpose for some women. But did it tell the truth about all of the men on it? In an interview on Wednesday, Mr. Elliott said: “No one is going to come forward and say that I raped them. I don’t believe even my enemies believe I raped somebody.”

So what does he want? “An apology would be good,” he said. “Legal fees would also be good. But maybe seeing it argued out in the court of law will help good people come to their senses and distance themselves from the rotten parts of this movement.”

Of the dozens of men accused of sexual misconduct this year, many proclaim their innocence. But Mr. Elliott is the first from the list who is known to have sued.