Why the right loves to hate George Soros

Bannon isn’t entirely wrong. Soros is not just an anti-nationalist, he’s someone who devoted a chapter of his 2003 book The Bubble of American Supremacy to overcoming the obstacle of sovereignty when using righteous military force against villains abroad. The man who once broke the British pound is not only ideologically opposed to Bannon’s beloved Brexit, he’s pouring some of his considerable wealth into holding a new referendum to reverse it.

Just because the populists are paranoid, that is to say, doesn’t mean Soros isn’t the most important non-politician standing against their goals. And with Republicans now tacking nationalist, it was only a matter of time until Soros-mania penetrated the mainstream.

For too long, American political observers assumed that Washington was somehow immune to the National Front-style political cocktail of xenophobia, welfare statism, and hostility to the post-World War II institutions that promoted inter-western peace. Democrats campaigned against trade, Republicans against illegal immigration, but you always knew they’d revert to the “Washington consensus” once in office. Donald Trump drove a steamroller through those insincerities, and now Orban has gone from D.C.’s diplomatic doghouse to the big kids’ table.