By ditching the NRA, companies are dividing Americans

Because the bulk of corporate CEOs or PR teams for these companies live in Westchester or Los Angeles or San Francisco, they forget that many of their regular consumers who live Akron, Ohio; Westby, Wis.; or Baldwin, Mich., do not share their point of view. When you’re a national brand, you have to sell your product nationally. You can’t be ignorant of the cultural divide.

And how big is the market share of people who might have been offended by these corporate moves? According to a Pew survey, 19 percent of Americans say they belong to the NRA while three in 10 adults say they currently own a gun. Attacking the NRA is akin to attacking 30 percent of the country.

Last fall even the NFL — the strongest brand in America — suffered a ratings hit when players refused to stand for the national anthem. Annoyed that the NFL did nothing to stop politics and division from invading the national pastime, consumers found other ways to spend their Sundays. According to Nielsen, the average football audience was 14.9 million in 2017, compared to 16.5million in 2016.