Video games aren't good for you

For most of their history, video games were a fringe pastime, the loser kid brother to traditional entertainments like sports. Gamers were doughy nerds who subsisted on Doritos and Mountain Dew and feared women and sunshine.

But over the past decade, video games have achieved something of a societal coup. Piggybacking off the rise of smartphones and social media, gaming has swung with lightning speed into total ubiquity. Businessmen play them on the subway. Kids play them in school. Korean teens become millionaires playing them. Your grandmother is probably still playing Candy Crush.

Journalists play them, too, which is why they’ve recently subjected the public to a deluge of scribbling justifying the habit. Over at Reason, Peter Suderman has given us the mother of all such pieces: “Young Men Are Playing Video Games Instead of Getting Jobs. That’s OK. (For Now.)”