Hillary Clinton clinches Democratic nomination

Wins in Guam and Puerto Rico, along with superdelegates sliding her way, put the former Secretary of State, Senator from New York and First Lady of the United States and of Arkansas over the top, according to The Associated Press. The evening alert brought the long-awaited end to her fierce primary campaign against populist rival Bernie Sanders, who proved a more durable and formidable opponent than she had expected, and an American electorate that, even after decades in the public eye, still was not warm toward Clinton.

Now, her focus turns to her Republican rival, billionaire Donald Trump who has proved an unpredictable and unprecedented opponent. Trump vanquished 16 rivals—Governors, Senators and industry leaders alike—to prevail in the GOP race with a blend of populist anger, new voters and long-shot promises that would be near impossible to enact. Clinton’s victory over Sanders shows her campaign is capable of derailing the pie-in-the-sky rhetoric. But it isn’t easy, even with a sophisticated political apparatus behind her.

The Clinton campaign is perhaps the most advanced ever, with teams of data scientists, message analysts, new media mavens and traditional get-out-the-vote engineers packed into two stories of a Brooklyn headquarters and around the country.