Can Ron Paul rescue Rand's campaign?

Ron declared his son, the junior senator from Kentucky, “our best hope to restore liberty, limited government and the Bill of Rights and finally end the big spending status quo in Washington, D.C.”

“Even where Rand and I do have minor differences of opinion, I would take Rand’s position over any of his opponents’ in both parties every time,” he continued. He then took aim at the press. “I know the media likes to play this little game where they pit us, or certain views, against each other,” Ron said. “Don’t fall for it. They’re trying to manufacture storylines at liberty’s expense. You’ve spent years seeing how the media treated me. They aren’t my friends and they aren’t yours.”

None of this is surprising, but it is a slight tactical shift. When Rand Paul launched his presidential bid, his famous father sat in the audience rather than on stage. It was symbolic of the small role his father was going to play in the 2016 campaign, perhaps even smaller than the one he played in Rand’s run for the Senate. The younger Paul has occasionally refused to answer questions about his father’s post-congressional political activities.