Federal government ends hunt for housing for children crossing border

An official with the Department of Health and Human Services, which led the search for shelters, said there has been a decrease in the number of children apprehended at the border and an increase in those sent to live with families or friends.

“We have begun to see some initial signs of progress along our southwest border,” said Kenneth Wolfe, a spokesman for HHS’ Administration for Children and Families.

The number of unaccompanied children traveling from El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras, most through the Rio Grande Valley in Texas, surged this year. But officials say the influx slowed this summer likely because of many factors, including the weather, a media campaign urging parents not to send their children to the U.S. and the arrest of some people bringing children over the border.