The charges against Rick Perry are flimsy but a jury might convict anyway

When you decide to criminally charge a governor in a case with serious constitutional implications, you should have strong facts and clearly applicable law. Few people (including Perry) would have been put on notice that such laws could be used to criminalize this political dispute. Michael McCrum, the special prosecutor handling the case, had to pound very hard to get these square facts into round holes. A bit too hard.

The problem is that such constitutional concerns can get lost in a trial, as shown by the trial of another governor: Illinois Democratic Gov. Rod Blagojevich. Blagojevich was given a 14-year sentence for seeking a quid pro quo arrangement in exchange for the appointment of a replacement for the Senate seat Barack Obama vacated to become president. Many of us criticized the indictment for criminalizing common political horse-trading. However, Blagojevich was hurt by witness testimony and recordings with vulgar and raw exchanges between politicians. It reaffirmed the view of many that politicians are untrustworthy and sleazy.

In fairness to the prosecutor in Texas, we have not seen the evidence he intends to bring to court. Raw behind-the-scenes testimony can color a case and distract from what might seem abstract arguments based on inherent executive authority. Many jurors find it a challenge to give any politician a presumption of innocence in any forum.